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COMMENTS

  • thr3shold

    This is actually quite old and I reproduced it and took a webcam vid of it, though because the webcam sucked, so did the video, but you can see what’s going on.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pyzUGRr1OJs

  • http://www.hight3ch.com MistaPrimeMinista

    Thank you for your comment.
    Your video is impressive too, great job !

  • http://www.gusto5.net gusto5

    well, with my limited insight, i will guess that by changing the way the liquid vibrates, you’ve changed the structure that the molecules are bonded in. It’s sort of like boiling water. Water changes in to gas form because you speed up the molecules with heat. I suppose a similar procedure is being done with the faraday waves.

  • Uncout

    Cornstarch is a type of non newtonian liquid, my guess is that the effect is due to this. for those who dont know, a non newtonian liquid is liquid when moved gently, but solid when impacted hard

  • http://www.hight3ch.com MistaPrimeMinista

    Its good to know !! Im so ignorant about this :)

  • Toby

    That would be a great way to mess with your friends heads, especially in a dorm room or something.
    I know, I’m slightly immature, but still!

  • iD

    5 year olds have been doing this for years:
    http://www.kinderteacher.com/oobleck.htm
    these guys just recorded it on film, and applied some fancy thousand-dollar paintcan shaker.
    :shrug:

  • James King

    CornStarch is reactive to pressure, if you keep it moving in your hands it’s solid like putty, if you stop moving it it returns to liquid. You can bounce off a bucket of it, but standing on it you will sink. The vibrations cause standing waves which are pressurised areas, hence the fingers that are produced. It’s funky stuff

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  • Grumbles

    The cornstarch mixture is a non-newtonian fluid, i.e. it’s a fluid that doesn’t behave like a fluid should. The vibrations aren’t neccessary for it to behave oddly, however, they add a cool effect. If you were to have a large pool of the stuff, you could run across it without sinking at all. Of course, you would have to run: it only acts like a solid when stress is applied. If you were to walk or stand there, you’d sink as if it were water. Very slimy water.

  • critter

    Newtonian materials exhibit linear stress vs strain behavior (water). Stuff like cornstarch in water is dilatent, meaning that the stress increases with strain. So you try to push it harder it resists and begins to behave like a solid. Pick up a glob of cornstarch and water and throw it at your brother if you doubt it. (Hit him on the arm, not his head.)

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  • whatever

    it’s called oobleck. we learned about it in a science course. read the dr. seuss book bartholomew and the oobleck.

  • http://enculator.com fab

    I saw it on mythbuster, they gave an explanation.
    The muth about “walking on water”, the special ninja show

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